Friday, September 12, 2008

Part of the Process

Before I write about the future, I need to correct the past. Not ten minutes after I'd written yesterday's post, my night nurse came in and hung a new 1L bag of saline on the stand. That meant that over a 24-hour period, I got just about 2.25 L of water (and 0.9% saline)—essentially, those 8 cups of water I need daily to deal with the busulfan. I thought about it and realized the binder (which I really must finish) is written for the majority of bone marrow transplant patients here, who are treated as outpatients. So that was to make sure they drank 8 cups of water while they were home. Inpatient that I am, it just gets put out in bags for me. Still, nothing wrong with a beverage now and then.

Now, on to the future.

In talking to friends and relatives, I've discovered there's a lot of misunderstanding about the process of what I'm going through. So, in an effort to keep from repeating myself, here's the broad overview.

From Sunday to Wednesday, I had four daily fludarabine treatments. It was pretty mild, as promised. I started the Busulfan as promised, and as promised it was a bit harder. Still easily tolerated—no nausea—but still almost guaranteed diarrhea (check) and a menace to liver and kidneys, as I mentioned yesterday. I had to take a bunch of extra drugs for that yesterday, and a few less extra drugs today.

The Busulfan (which I keep wanting to type with a 'ph') ends on Sunday, and then we give my body a break. It's important to remember that no matter how well I physically respond to chemo, it's still the same horror inside I described a while back; every chemo, including the two I did as an outpatient, weakens my body to some degree. This combo of chemo not only wipes out all my marrow, it wipes out any quickly-multiplying cells. That includes not only cancer cells, but other, perfectly normal and healthy cells that always multiply quickly.

Anyway, on the 14th post-Busulfan, I get ATG, an anti–T-cell medication. Yes, T-cells are designed to detect incoming viruses and other foreign intruders, but in this case we want to switch that ability off to let the new marrow to do its thing, hopefullly warding off graft vs. host disease (GvHD). Potential side effects from ATG include flu-like symptoms and allergic reactions. Joy.

On the 15th, I get started on my old pals fluconazole (anti-fungal) and acyclovir (anti-viral).

On the 16th, 48 hours after the Busulfan dose—the early afternoon—I'll be getting my transplant of stem cells.

First, an explanation for those who haven't been around the whole time. We talk about bone marrow, but what transplant recipients like me really need are healthy stem cells. Bone marrow contains plenty of the stem cells we need, but times have changed. In 70% of all extraction cases, we get the required stem cells through a process called PBSC (peripheral blood stem cell) extraction. This process is similar to donating blood, except the donor gets change: the blood is extracted through a needle, which takes the blood to an apheresis machine, which separates the stem cells from the rest of the blood. Anything that isn't needed for the extraction is returned to the donor. As for those remaining extractions, yes, those are actual bone marrow—a spongy red tissue.

Either way, my transplant works the same. Not through any kind of operation, but by pumping the stem cells/marrow through my chest catheter, the same way as I get my blood transfusions, for example. As I understand it marrow transplants take three hours or so (don't quote me on that); my transplant, which is of stem cells, is 60-80 minutes (two units, 30-40 minutes per unit).

"But wait," you might ask. "I have been following your posts, and you've mentioned that your catheter is a central venous catheter. That is, it goes into your heart to get pumped into the bloodstream. So how do the stem cells get to inside your bones, which is where they'll generate the new marrow?" Ah, that is the freaky part, the part that medical professionals marvel over but don't question, because hey, it works. The stem cells know where to go and they just get themselves there.

A moment's pause for the awesomeness of creation, please.

I will have photos taken of me with the bags, and maybe one or two of me standing next to the pump as the stuff is going into me. Other than that, I plan to curl up with a book or movie or something to pass the time. Aside from getting a new birthday (my fist birthday was made up of two multiples; my second is made up of two squares! Awesome!) it's really quite boring.

Around now I'll be put on tarolimus, an anti-rejection drug and another means of anticipating GvHD. If there is no GvHD, I'll only need it for 4–6 weeks. If there is GvHD, then I'll need to take it for at least 3 months before tapering it off.

A couple of days after Day Zero is when the excitement starts. As before, my counts (for white blood cells, hemoglobins, neutrophils, platelets, and other blood components) will start to drop, which is when I'll start to get tired (low hemoglobins) and particularly vulnerable to bugs without and within (neutrophils and white blood cells make up the immune system's front line).

This is when the doctors start really paying attention to me. At the first sign of a fever, for intstance—and I will get one—they swoop in to find out what's causing it, and if they can't do that right away they pump me up with a variety of antibiotics until they can. (Earlier this year, when I had that horrible fever that had me clutching ice bags to my body, a doctor casually informed me a few days later that what got me was a strain of e. coli that was resistant to the drug I was being administered. They switched the drug, and the e. coli didn't have a chance.)

The docs will also be scoping me daily for the first hint of mucositis, and monitoring its progress. The fear there is that the sores will go far enough down my throat that I will be physically unable to eat much—and we've been working on getting more protein and calories in me to get my weight and muscle mass back up. If it comes to it—and this happens in many cases, I'm told, no matter how much people eat to avoid it—it's time for a feeding tube to be inserted into my nose and down to my stomach. (The width of the tube is somewhere between the size of my MacBook power cable and that of the Ethernet cable. And apparently I won't feel most of it... but I figure I'll feel enough!) The advantages to a feeding tube are that it can be clamped off when not in use, so I can walk around. Also, I'm guaranteed to get the nutrition I need (and keep my stomach exercised) no matter how iffy the food is tastewise. But still.

Two to three weeks after Day Zero is the show we're all waiting for. That's when the new marrow should engraft with my body. Speaking to the transplant doctor, he said he's never seen engraftment not happen, except for one case. They boosted the patient's body with fligrastim (the same stuff they use to boost donors' stem cell levels if they're donating via PBSC), and everything went fine after.

Assuming everything goes well, I'll be out of here in early to mid-October. Of course, things aren't over yet. The first 100 days are crucial. I'll be spending much of my time in self-imposed exile at home, both working to get back into shape and resting. I'll have weekly checkups, but in Ottawa. I'll still have to be careful about what I eat, etc., as the immune system will still be rebuilding itself. There are a bunch of other issues as well, such as lichenoid texture (leather-like skin) which can happen a year after Day Zero. It's treatable and it does go away, but it's symbolic: I don't really and truly count my lucky stars until a year after the transplant, when all (most?) of its side effects go away, and my bone marrow biospsy comes back clear.

Labels: , ,

0 Comments:

Post a Comment

Links to this post:

Create a Link

<< Home